Lee's Summit R-7 School District
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Can It Be Prevented?

A number of prevention efforts are focused at detecting suicide warning signs. Signals that a young person may be contemplating suicide imminently include: Thinking or talking about or threatening suicide; seeking a way to kill oneself; increased substance abuse; feelings of purposelessness, anxiety, being trapped, or hopeless; withdrawing from people and activities; and expressing unusual anger, recklessness, or mood changes.

Prevention efforts take many forms, such as general suicide awareness education, school and community gatekeeper programs, screening and peer support programs, crisis centers and hotlines, restriction of access to lethal means, counseling and clinical interventions, and postvention (intervention with friends/family/community after a suicide takes place). Adults who supervise a young person can help prevent suicide by knowing the risk factors and warning signs, asking a youth they are concerned about if he/she has been thinking about suicide, and if necessary, providing a referral and making sure the person gets appropriate help as soon as possible.

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Who’s at Risk?

Suicide among teens and young adults has nearly tripled since the 1940’s. Several factors can put a young person at risk for suicide; however, having risk factors does not always mean that a young person will attempt suicide. Risk factors include: family history of suicide; history of depression, other mental health problems, or incarceration; easy access to lethal means; alcohol and drug use; exposure to previous suicidal behavior by others; and residential mobility that might lessen opportunities for developing healthy social connections and supports.

Suicide affects all youth, but some groups are at higher risk than others. Boys are more likely than girls to die from suicide. Of the reported suicides in the 10 to 24 age group, 81% of the deaths were males and 19% were females. Girls, however, are more likely to report attempting suicide than boys. Native American/Alaskan Native youth have the highest rates of suicide-related fatalities. A nationwide survey high school students in the U.S. found Hispanic youth were more likely to report attempting suicide than their black and white, non-Hispanic peers.

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What’s the Problem?

Suicide is a serious public health problem that affects many young people. Suicide is the third leading cause of death for youth between the ages of 10 and 24, and results in approximately 4,600 lives lost each year.

Deaths from youth suicide are only part of the problem. More young people survive suicide attempts than actually die. A nationwide survey of high school students in the United States found that 16% of students reported seriously considering suicide, 13% reported creating a plan, and 8% reporting trying to take their own life in the 12 months preceding the survey. Each year, approximately 157,000 youth between the ages of 10 and 24 are treated Emergency Departments across the U.S. for self-inflicted injuries.

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What are some ways I can help my child stay away from drugs and alcohol?

  • Set rules within the house: Make sure that your family knows that there is zero tolerance for use of drugs/alcohol. Be sure to set consequences for breaking this rule.
  • Keep tabs on your teen: Always know where they will be and what they will be doing when away from the house unsupervised. Be sure to occasionally check up on your teen and make sure that they are where they said they will be.
  • Know your teen’s friends and their parents. Offer to have them over to your house for a movie night or make plans to attend an event together.
  • Encourage your teen to be involved in after-school activities: sports, clubs, fitness programs, etc. The more they are involved, the less time they have to experiment with drugs or alcohol.
  • Talk to your teen: Ask them how their day went, about their friends, what plans they have for the weekend, etc.
  • Plan family activities: Strengthen the bond that you have with your teen.
  • Make a habit of borrowing your child’s car on short notice. If you do this, they will not have time to clean out the car or hide anything they shouldn’t have in it.
  • If your child goes to a party, ask them to call you half way into the night. Also, mention that you will call them. Teens are less likely to get drunk if they know they have to have a coherent conversation with you.

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If I suspect that my teen is using, where should I look to confirm my suspicions?

Places to look

  • Dresser drawers, socks, beneath or between clothes, in pockets of pants
  • Desk drawers
  • Cars: glove box, ash trays, under seats
  • CD/DVD/Tape/Video cases
  • Small boxes – jewelry, pencil, etc.
  • Under a bed or mattress
  • Between books on a bookshelf
  • In books with pages cut out
  • Makeup cases – inside fake lipstick tubes or compacts
  • Inside over-the-counter medicine containers
  • Backpacks/duffle bags

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